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this week as did the number one police officer in london, the chief of scotland yard. that is just one of the ways the whole rupert murdoch scandal is getting awkward for politics and its most high-profile politicians, same goes for david cameron, also the leader of the conservative party, and the man he picked to be his communications director was arrested earlier this month. today the conservative party admitted ties to another person arrested in the scandal, advised on political matters in the run-up to the general election by a man named neil wallis. wallis was also arrested last week. in terms of the scale of the criminal behavior at hand and how much the company brass knew about it, the lithe of people we know to have been paid off to keep the story from getting any bigger now includes 700,000 pounds paid to a soccer union boss. one of the conditions of the settlement -- of the payment was con fi den chalty. also sienna miller got 100,000 pounds and andy gray was paid 20,000 pounds after the people's phones were hacked into, which is illegal. is it plausible that the brass at rup
over the weekend, and now the head of scotland yard and his assistant are resigning. if you're keeping score so far, there have been three high-profile resignations, ten arrests and it is not over yet. jim maceda is live in london to bring us up to speed on this. jim, good morning. >> reporter: hi there, thomas. make that four high profile resignations. just a couple of hours ago scotland yard's number two, john yates, also resigned under increasing, extraordinary, really, pressure. that on the heels on his boss's resignation last night. commissioner paul stevenson, he was the head of scotland yard. he, if you will, fell on his sword and said that he could not in good conscience continue with all the challenges to keep the peace in great britain as he and specifically his relationship with the murdock media empire became such a focus of attention. he was calling it a major distraction, which could not go on. of course among those ten arrests you mentioned, the latest high profile arrest was rebekah brooks, the chief of the british media holdings. she said it came as a complete surprise
bomber convicted of killing 270 people over scotland more than 22 years ago appeared at a rally in support of moammar gadhafi. take a look. you see him there. the former libyan intelligence agents abdel al-megrahi was released from prison in 2009. >>> and a rescue from the rains in south korea. many of the people killed in the landslide were college students doing volunteer work. >>> police are warning female shoppers to be on the lookout in the washington d.c. area and northern virginia area. police are searching for a man making sneak attacks in area shopping malls. his target? their back sides. the man's m.o. is to create a diversion before slashing with a box cutter. these attacks started in february. >>> the woman known as the jay walking mom was convicted in connection with the death of her 4-year-old son. she faced up to three years in prison. the judge in the case gave her the choice of community service and one year of probation or to go to trial once again. >> we are weighing our options right now. there is a part of me that doesn't want to go through it again. by the
britain. the idea that scotland yard and the prime minister and, you know, journalists at "news of the world" -- >> i feel like it's people whether you read the wiki leaks things or -- you go, of course, of course, and then some of the sex scanned always, of course he was sending a pictures of himself, or you see, of course, of course they're hacking. it's one of those things like where it's your worst fear, but it keeps getting confirmed. >> what it shows me is my how tame my own formr form of journalism is. i do think for murdoch, when you talk to folks like eliot spitzer, but there's a real threat to his fcc licenses, because bribing northeastern people if you're a u.s.-based company means you have vulnerability. >> if you're not familiar, which we're all kind of learning this away, america has the law called 9 foreign corrupt practices act, which means if you do business in america, and you exhibit corrupt behavior of some kind, paying bribes, in a foreign land, so let's say you're an oil company bribing somebody in russia to get access to an oil field, i can prosecute you,
publications. and scotland yard has expanded the investigation to 60 officers, and meanwhile in australia, their government is introducing legislation allowing citizens to sue for serious invasion of privacy. >>> and coming up, alabama followed arizona passing a tougher immigration law to make it against the law to take an illegal immigrant to the hospital. today a civil rights organization filed a lawsuit to challenge the law. and i will talk to the alabama lawmaker who calls the legislation one of the most awful laws ever passed in the state. >>> and john edwards was just ordered to pay back the government more than $2 million. and find out why british airways gave the duke and dutch ches of cambridge a refund after their flight home. >>> time for the your business entrepreneur of the week. bill and john set out to streamline the bathroom remodeling business. they created bath simple, a bath in a box to treat the bath as a single product. they put the toilet and the tiles and the tiniest screws inside of one box. for more watch "your business" sundays at 7:30 a.m. and highlights. now in
's because one of the avenues of investigation is were those bribes paid to scotland yard officers by "news of the world" a violation of federal anti-bribery law. so, there's -- there's multiple fronts on which this is escalating for news corp., on top of the reports today that james murdoch may have to go back before parliament. >> and, mike, is any of this touching the media properties in the united states yet of the rupert murdoch empire, or is all this still stemming from the actions done with the uk media properties? >> well, certainly the computer hacking is an allegation involving a news corp. subsidiary in the united states, so that's the jurisdictional hook there. there's a problem there because it took place seven years ago, outside the statute of limitations, but if there is a pattern of conduct that could be established here, that would be the basis by which the feds could bring charges. but, you know, it's early yet. we got to be cautious. >> all right, mike isikoff, our national investigative correspondent, mike, thanks very much. >> thank you. >>> all right, once every decade
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6

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